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Natick

The name Natick comes from the language of the Massachusett Native American tribe and means place of hills. The original settlement, in the community of South Natick, is a hilly area. Located in the community of West Natick is Captain Tom's Hill, which was the site of a small Indian encampment during King Philips War. Natick was first settled in 1651 by John Eliot, a Puritan missionary born in Widford, Hertfordshire, England who received a commission and funds from England's Long Parliament to settle the Massachusett Indians on both sides of the Charles River, on land deeded from the settlement at Dedham. They were called Praying Indians – Eliot was best known for attempting to preserve the culture (minus the religion) of the Native Americans by putting them in thirteen planned towns where they could continue by their own rule, with Natick as the political and spiritual center. Eliot and Praying Indian translators printed America's first written Bible in the Algonquian language.